10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018
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10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018

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These 10 states impose the highest taxes on retirees, according to Kiplinger’s 2018 analysis of state taxes. One treats Social Security benefits just like Uncle Sam does—taxing up to 85% of your benefits. Six others tax Social Security benefits if your earnings exceed specific income thresholds. Exemptions for other types of retirement income are limited or nonexistent.

In several states, property taxes are on the high side, too. Making matters worse: The tax overhaul capped the federal tax deduction for state and local taxes at $10,000. That won’t affect people who claim the standard deduction, but if you itemize and live in a state with high income and property taxes, the cap will effectively increase your taxes.

SEE ALSO: 10 Most Tax-Friendly States for Retirees

Take a look to see how you’d fare as a retiree in these states. The worst comes first.

SEE ALSO: Best States for Low Taxes: 50 States Ranked for Taxes, 2018

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10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018 | Slide 2 of 12

1. Minnesota

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State income tax: 5.35% (on taxable income of less than $25,890 for single filers/$37,850 for joint filers) — 9.85% (on taxable income of more than $160,020 for single filers/$266,700 for joint filers)

Average local sales tax: 7.43%

Estate tax/Inheritance tax: Yes/No

Go to full state profile

The North Star State offers cold comfort on the tax front to retirees. Social Security income is taxable to the same extent as it is on your federal return, though residents with income under $77,000 get to subtract up to $4,500.

Pensions are taxable, unless they’re from the military. Distributions from individual retirement accounts and 401(k) plans are taxable, too.

Food, clothing, prescription and nonprescription drugs are exempt from state sales tax. A few cities and counties also add a sales tax.

The median property tax on Minnesota’s median home value of $191,500 is $2,234, slightly above the average rate for the U.S. Minnesota homeowners of any age whose property taxes are high relative to their income may be eligible for a state-paid refund.

For 2018, estates valued at more than $2.4 million are subject to a maximum estate tax rate of 16%. The exemption will rise to $2.7 million in 2019 and $3 million for 2020 and beyond. Assets left to a surviving spouse are exempt.

SEE ALSO: Cheapest Places Where You’ll Want to Retire

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10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018 | Slide 3 of 12

2. Connecticut

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State income tax: 3% (on income of less than $10,000 for individual filers/$20,000 for joint filers) — 6.99% (on income of more than $500,000 for individual filers/$1 million for joint filers)

Average state and local sales tax: 6.35% (7.75% for certain luxury items)

Estate tax/Inheritance tax: Yes/No

Go to full state profile

The Constitution State is a tax nightmare for many retirees.

Social Security benefits are taxable for residents with federal adjusted gross income of more than $50,000 or married taxpayers filing jointly with federal AGI above $60,000. Retirement plans, private pensions and out-of-state government and federal civil-service pensions are fully taxed. Military pensions are excluded from state taxes.

Connecticut has the fourth-highest property taxes in the U.S., and residents in some high-cost areas will bump up against the new $10,000 cap on federal deductions for state and local taxes. The median property tax on Connecticut’s median home value of $269,300 is $5,443.

Connecticut offers property tax credits to homeowners who are at least 65 years old and meet income restrictions. Income ceilings are $43,000 for married couples (with a maximum benefit of $1,250) and $35,300 for singles (with a maximum benefit of $1,000).

There are no local sales taxes in Connecticut, so you’ll pay only the statewide rate of 6.35% on your purchases. Clothing, footwear and accessories priced at more than $1,000 and luxury items (such as jewelry) worth more than $5,000 are taxed at 7.75%.

Connecticut imposes an estate tax on the transfer of estates valued at $2.6 million or more at a progressive rate starting at 7.2%. The rate rises to a maximum of 12% for an estate valued above $10.1 million. Connecticut is also the only state with a gift tax, which applies to real and tangible personal property in Connecticut and intangible personal property anywhere for permanent residents. Only the amount given after January 1, 2005, and over $2.6 million is taxed, starting at 7.2% of the excess and rising to $735,000 plus 12% of the excess over $10.1 million.

SEE ALSO: Claim These Tax Deductions Even If You Don’t Itemize

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10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018 | Slide 4 of 12

3. Kansas

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State income tax: 3.1% (on less than $15,000 of taxable income for single filers/$30,000 for joint filers) — 5.7% (on more than $30,000 of taxable income for single filers/$60,000 for joint filers)

Average state and local sales tax: 8.68%

Estate tax/Inheritance tax: No/No

Go to full state profile

Faced with a ballooning budget deficit, lawmakers in Kansas boosted taxes in 2017, making the state even less friendly for retirees. Distributions from individual retirement accounts, 401(k) plans and out-of-state pensions are fully taxed. Kansas excludes Social Security benefits from state income taxes for residents with a federal adjusted gross income of $75,000 or less, but those with a higher AGI will pay taxes on those benefits, too. Military, civil-service and in-state public pensions are exempt from state income taxes.

The Sunflower State’s combined state and local sales tax rate is the eighth-highest in the U.S. Property taxes are above average for the U.S., too. The median property tax on Kansas’s median home value of $135,300 is $1,890.

Homeowners 55 and older who earn $35,000 or less are eligible for a refund of up to $700 under the Homestead Property Tax Refund Act. (Note: 50% of Social Security benefits can be excluded from income for the purposes of qualifying for this program.) The Safe Senior property tax refund is available for homeowners 65 or older with household income of $19,800 or less in 2018. The refund is 75% of the property taxes paid. The appraised value of the home cannot exceed $350,000 in order to receive this refund. Those who claim this refund cannot claim a homestead refund.

SEE ALSO: 24 Great Places to Retire Near the Beach

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10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018 | Slide 5 of 12

4. Vermont

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State income tax: 3.35% (on income of less than $38,700 for individual filers/$64,600 for joint filers) – 8.75% (on taxable income of more than $195,450 for individual filers/$237,950 for joint filers)

Average state and local sales tax: 6.18%

Estate tax/Inheritance tax: Yes/No

Go to full state profile

You’ll need plenty of firewood to make it through Vermont winters, and plenty of money for the tax bill in the Green Mountain State. It has a steep top income tax rate, and most retirement income is taxed. The state also taxes all or part of Social Security benefits for single residents with federal adjusted gross income over $45,000 (over $60,000 for married couples filing a joint return).

Local jurisdictions can add 1% to the state sales tax, but the average combined state and local sales tax rate is 6.18%. Food for home consumption, clothing, and nonprescription drugs are exempt. But you’ll pay 9% tax on prepared foods, restaurant meals and lodging, and 10% if you order a glass of wine or beer in a restaurant.

The median property tax on the state’s median home value of $218,900 is $3,893, the eighth-highest in the U.S. Eligible Vermont residents can make a claim for a rebate of their school and municipal property taxes if their household income does not exceed a certain level.

Vermont taxes estates that exceed $2.75 million. The maximum estate-tax rate is a flat 16%. Assets left to a surviving spouse are exempt.

SEE ALSO: Great Tiny Homes for Retirement

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10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018 | Slide 6 of 12

5. Nebraska

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State income tax: 2.46% (on up to $3,150 of taxable income for single filers/$6,290 for married couples filing jointly) – 6.84% (on taxable income over $30,420 for single filers/$60,480 for married couples filing jointly)

Average state and local sales tax: 6.89%

Estate tax/Inheritance tax: No/Yes

Go to full state profile

The Cornhusker State taxes some Social Security benefits and most other retirement income, including retirement-plan withdrawals and public and private pensions. And the top rate kicks in pretty quickly: It applies to taxable income above $30,420 for single filers and $60,480 for married couples filing jointly.

Residents can subtract Social Security income included in federal adjusted gross income if their AGI is $58,000 or less for married couples filing jointly or $43,000 for single residents.

Food and prescription drugs are exempt from sales taxes. Local jurisdictions can add an additional 2% to the state rate. The average state and local combined sales tax rate is 6.89%.

The median property tax on the state’s median home value of $137,300 is $2,506, the seventh-highest in the U.S.

Nebraska’s inheritance tax is a local tax administered by counties and ranges from 1% to 18%. Assets left to a spouse or charity are exempt.

SEE ALSO: 20 Dividend Stocks to Fund 20 Years of Retirement

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10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018 | Slide 7 of 12

6. New Mexico

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State income tax: 1.7% (on up to $5,500 of taxable income for single filers/$8,000 for married couples filing jointly) – 4.9% (on taxable income over $16,000 for single filers/$24,000 for married couples filing jointly)

Average state and local sales tax: 7.78%

Estate tax/Inheritance tax: No/No

Go to full state profile

The Land of Enchantment is not a magical place for well-off retirees. Social Security benefits, retirement accounts and pensions are all taxable. The state does offer a retirement-income exemption of up to $8,000, but you must meet certain income restrictions to qualify.

Residents 65 and older qualify for the exemption if they are single and have adjusted gross income under $28,500; married couples who file jointly qualify for the exemption if their income is less than $51,000.

New Mexico’s sales tax is a gross receipts tax that covers most services.

On the plus side, property taxes are well below average for the U.S. The median property tax on New Mexico's median home value of $161,600 is $1,232.

Homeowners 65 and older who earn $16,000 or less are eligible for a property tax credit of up to $250 (if married filing jointly) or $125 (if single). Also, low-income homeowners 65 or older can apply to have the tax valuation of their property frozen. Residents of Los Alamos and Santa Fe counties who earn $24,600 or less may also qualify for a low-income property tax rebate.

Oh, and if you make it to 100 years old, income tax is completely waived.

SEE ALSO: The 10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Military Retirees

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10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018 | Slide 8 of 12

7. Utah

Moritz Zimmermann, CC BY-SA 3.0

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State income tax: 4.95% flat tax

Average state and local sales tax: 6.78% (groceries taxed at 3%)

Estate tax/Inheritance tax: No/No

Go to full state profile

The Beehive State taxes Social Security benefits, as well as distributions from retirement savings plans and income from public and private pensions. The state offers a retirement-income tax credit for seniors who meet certain income limits.

The state sales tax is 5.95%, including a 2.15% tax that goes to local governments. Localities can add up to an additional 2.65%; the average combined rate is 6.78%. Food is taxed at 3%.

Residents 65 and older may be able to claim a retirement-income tax credit of up to $450 per person ($900 per married couple), subject to income-eligibility limits. The credit is phased out at 2.5 cents per dollar of modified AGI over $16,000 for married individuals filing separately, $25,000 for singles and $32,000 for married people filing jointly. The credit can be used to offset taxes on Social Security benefits and distributions from individual retirement accounts and public and private pensions. Distributions from 401(k) plans are fully taxable.

Taxpayers younger than 65 can claim a nonrefundable tax credit of up to 6% of eligible retirement income or $288, whichever is less.

Property taxes are well below average. The median property tax on Utah’s median home value of $224,600 is $1,508.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things Retirees Should Buy at Costco

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10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018 | Slide 9 of 12

8. Maryland

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State income tax: 2% (on less than $1,000 of taxable income) – 5.75% (on more than $250,000 of taxable income for single filers/$300,000 for joint filers)

Average state and local sales tax: 6%

Estate tax/Inheritance tax: Yes/Yes

Go to full state profile

The Free State can be pricey for many retirees. Maryland’s combined state and local income taxes are high, and distributions from individual retirement accounts are fully taxable. In addition to the state income tax, Maryland’s 23 counties and Baltimore City may levy additional income taxes ranging from 1.75% to 3.20% of taxable income. The average levy is 2.9%, according to the Tax Foundation.

Maryland doesn’t tax Social Security benefits. If you are 65 or older or totally disabled (or your spouse is totally disabled), you qualify for an exclusion of up to $30,600 on distributions from 401(k), 403(b) and 457 plans, along with income from public and private pensions.

The median property tax on Maryland’s median home value of $290,400 is $3,191. In some high-cost suburbs of Washington, D.C., residents could run up against the $10,000 cap on federal deductions for state and local taxes.

Maryland is the only state that has an estate and an inheritance tax. Property passing to a spouse, child or other lineal descendant, spouse of a child or other lineal descendant, parent, grandparent or sibling is exempt from taxation. Property passing to other individuals is subject to a 10% tax.

Maryland’s estate tax is imposed on estates exceeding $4 million in 2018. In 2019 and beyond, it will rise to $5 million. The maximum tax rate is 16%.

SEE ALSO: 9 States With the Scariest Death Taxes

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10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018 | Slide 10 of 12

9. Indiana

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State income tax: Flat 3.23%

Average state and local sales tax: 7%

Estate tax/Inheritance tax: No/No

Go to full state profile

The Hoosier State promotes itself as a low-tax haven, but some retirees may beg to differ. While the state exempts Social Security benefits and offers limited exemptions for military pensions and federal civil-service pensions, IRAs, 401(k) plans and private pensions are fully taxable.

Non-exempted income will face a flat state tax of 3.23%, but counties add their own income levy, at rates reaching 3.38%. The average levy is 1.56%, according to the Tax Foundation.

Taxpayers 60 and older may exclude as much as $5,000 from military pensions. Taxpayers age 62 and older may deduct from their adjusted gross income up to $1,000 from a federal civil-service annuity (minus Social Security and railroad retirement benefits received). Out-of-state pensions are fully taxed.

The state sales tax rate is 7%, and there are no local taxes.

The median property tax on the state's median home value of $126,500 is $1,100, below average for the U.S. Homeowners can deduct up to $2,500 from their income taxes for property taxes paid on their residence.

Homeowners 65 and older who earn $25,000 or less (combined for a married couple) are eligible to receive a tax reduction on property with an assessed value of $182,430 or less. A surviving spouse is entitled to the deduction if he or she is at least 60 years old and the deceased was at least 65 at the time of death. The amount of the deduction is the lesser of one-half of the assessed value of the property or $12,480. Veterans 62 or older with a disability of at least 10% may qualify for a similar deduction.

CALCULATOR: What's My Social Security Retirement Age?

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10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018 | Slide 11 of 12

10. Wisconsin

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State income tax: 4.0% (on up to $11,450 of taxable income for singles/up to $15,270 for married couples) – 7.65% (on taxable income over $252,150 for singles/over $336,200 for married couples)

Average state and local sales tax: 5.44%

Estate tax/Inheritance tax: No/No

Go to full state profile

The Badger State exempts Social Security benefits from state taxes, but income from pensions and annuities, along with distributions from IRAs and 401(k) plans are taxable. The state offers some retirement income exemptions, subject to income limits.

Property taxes are the fifth-highest in the U.S. The median property tax on Wisconsin’s median home value of $167,000 is $3,257.

Retirees who are 65 and older can subtract up to $5,000 of retirement income, including distributions from IRAs, from Wisconsin taxable income if their federal adjusted gross income is less than $15,000 ($30,000 for a married couple filing jointly).

SEE ALSO: 50 Best Places to Retire in the U.S. 2018

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10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2018 | Slide 12 of 12

About Our Methodology

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To create our rankings, we evaluated data and state tax-policy details from a wide range of sources. These include:

Income Taxes

We looked at each state’s tax agency, plus this helpful document from the Tax Foundation. Rates and brackets are for the 2018 tax year unless otherwise noted.

SEE ALSO: Best States for Taxes 2018: All 50 States Ranked

Property Tax

Median income tax paid and median home values come from the U.S. Census American Community Survey and are 2016 data.

Sales Taxes

We also cite the Tax Foundation’s figure for average sales tax, which is a population-weighted average of local sales taxes. In states that let municipalities add sales taxes, this gives an estimate of what most people in a given state actually pay, as those rates can vary widely.

Retirement Income and Property Tax Exemptions

Each state’s tax agency.

SEE ALSO: 10 Most Tax-Friendly States for Retirees

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