Know Why Your Credit Score Changes: 9 Money Moves to Consider

Your credit score is a key indicator of your financial well-being and of the risk you pose to lenders. How good is yours?

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Your credit score is a key indicator of your financial well-being and of the risk you pose to lenders. The score that lenders most commonly check, known as a FICO score, typically ranges from 300 to 850. Generally, a score of about 700 or higher means you're managing your credit well. A score of 760 or higher is often what you need to get the lowest interest rates on loans.

Along with making moves to keep your credit score high, you'll want to avoid actions that could set it back. You're probably aware that paying bills late can wreak havoc on your score. But do you know what else can drag down your score -- and what has no effect?

Lisa Gerstner
Contributing Editor, Kiplinger's Personal Finance

Lisa has spent more than15 years with Kiplinger’s Personal Finance and heads up the magazine’s annual rankings of the best banks, best rewards credit cards, and financial-services firms with the best customer service. She reports on a variety of other topics, too, from retirement to health care to money concerns for millennials. She has shared her expertise as a guest on the Today Show, CNN, Fox, NPR, Cheddar and many other media outlets around the nation. Lisa graduated from Ball State University and received the school’s “Graduate of the Last Decade” award in 2014. A military spouse, she has moved around the U.S. and currently lives in the Philadelphia area with her husband and two sons.