10 Money-Losing Stock Picks That Might Make You Money Anyway

Here are 10 stock picks that might be losing money today, but shouldn't be forever. It could be a bumpy ride until they get over that hump, but once they do, watch out.

Tortoise and a hare
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Investors spent much of 2019 gobbling up a healthy helping of recent initial public offerings (IPOs) and other companies that haven't made a penny in profits.

However, the rapid rise and fall of WeWork sobered up Wall Street and knocked many of these money-losing (yet nonetheless popular) stock picks back toward some semblance of reality.

A quick recap: WeWork, a privately held company that specializes in leasing office space to startups, freelancers, and employees of large companies, garnered a $47 billion valuation as recently as January 2019. But ahead of an expected September IPO, diligent investors and members of the media scrutinized the company's financials, revealing corporate governance issues and massive, growing losses that forced WeWork to shelve its offering. The company's valuation plummeted, CEO Adam Neumann was forced to step down and Japanese multinational SoftBank (SFTBY (opens in new tab)), which heavily invested in WeWork ahead of the offering, recently gave the company a $9.5 billion "rescue" package that valued it at less than $8 billion.

Before the anticipated offering, New Constructs Investment Research analyst Sam McBride called WeWork the "most ridiculous IPO of 2019." Technically, he was wrong – the IPO never happened. Spiritually, he was right on the mark.

WeWork's fall from grace has sent numerous recent IPOs and other net-income-deficient stocks lower. But don't give them up for dead. Unprofitable companies, once they reach a certain scale and their businesses evolve, can end up creating profits and rewarding shareholders with red-hot gains. Just ask longtime Amazon.com (AMZN (opens in new tab)) shareholders.

Here are 10 stock picks that might be losing money today, but shouldn't be forever. It could be a bumpy ride until they get over that hump, but once they do, watch out.

Data is as of Oct. 28.

Will Ashworth
Contributing Writer, Kiplinger.com

Will has written professionally for investment and finance publications in both the U.S. and Canada since 2004. A native of Toronto, Canada, his sole objective is to help people become better and more informed investors. Fascinated by how companies make money, he's a keen student of business history. Married and now living in Halifax, Nova Scotia, he's also got an interest in equity and debt crowdfunding.