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Kimberly Lankford

Contributing Editor
Kiplinger's Personal Finance

As the "Ask Kim" columnist for Kiplinger's Personal Finance, Lankford receives hundreds of personal finance questions from readers every month. She is the author of Rescue Your Financial Life (McGraw-Hill, 2003), The Insurance Maze: How You Can Save Money on Insurance -- and Still Get the Coverage You Need (Kaplan, 2006), Kiplinger's Ask Kim for Money Smart Solutions (Kaplan, 2007) and The Kiplinger/BBB Personal Finance Guide for Military Families. She is frequently featured as a financial expert on television and radio, including NBC's Today Show, CNN, CNBC and National Public Radio.

Latest Features

Ask Kim
January 2017

Qualifying for the Retirement Savers' Tax Credit

Retirees who earned too much money in the past may now qualify for this credit.

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Ask Kim
January 2017

Tax Deductions for Independent Contractors

Write-offs for business expenses will help offset your self-employed income.

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Ask Kim
January 2017

As the College Bills Approach, Ratchet Down Risk in a 529 Savings Plan

When your son or daughter enters high school, or even before, start shifting some of the money from aggressive funds into more-conservative ones.

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Ask Kim
January 2017

8 Smart Financial Moves for the New Year

Our New Year's resolution is to help you improve your finances in 2017. Start with these strategies.

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Ask Kim
January 2017

How Speeding Tickets Affect Your Car Insurance Premiums

To minimize the sting of higher rates, see if you can get credit for taking a remedial driving course.

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Ask Kim
December 2016

Personal-Finance Columnist Kim Lankford's Best Money-Saving Tactics of 2016

Save thousands with our practical guidance on real-life questions about saving for retirement, paying for health care, cutting taxes and more.

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QUIZ
December 2016

Does Insurance Cover That?

You buy insurance to protect your finances from life's surprises. But unless you know the finer points of your policies, you could be left with another surprise -- no coverage where you thou...

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Ask Kim
December 2016

Why You Should Make a Charity the Heir to Your IRA

A charity doesn't have to pay taxes on the gift. And if you leave your heirs taxable investments instead, they probably won’t owe taxes on them, either.

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Ask Kim
December 2016

Managing Medicare Part B Premium Increases

If your modified adjusted gross income in 2015 was above a certain amount, you'll face a high-income surcharge on your premium.

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Ask Kim
December 2016

Last-Minute Ways to Spend Down Your Flexible Spending Account

Many firms that used to give employees until March to spend FSA funds now allow only $500 to be carried over to the New Year.

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Ask Kim
December 2016

Think Twice Before Declining Medicare Part D Coverage

If you decide you want it later, you'll have to pay a monthly late penalty for life.

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Ask Kim
December 2016

What You Should Know About Brokerage Account Fraud Protection

If you share your user name or password with a person or service, you may have a tougher time getting the brokerage firm to pay a claim.

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Ask Kim
December 2016

Even Retirees Working Part-Time Can Contribute to a Roth IRA

You can stash as much as you earned for the year in a Roth, up to $5,500 plus an extra $1,000 if you’re 50 or older.

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Ask Kim
December 2016

What Parents Should Know About Taxes on Custodial Accounts

If your child turns 21 and is still a full-time student, the account can still get hit with taxes.

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Ask Kim
December 2016

Should You Cancel Your Credit Card?

Beware: Your credit score could take a hit.

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Health Care & Insurance
December 2016

FAQs About Health Savings Accounts

A health savings account can be a powerful financial tool to cover medical expenses and save for the future.

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Ask Kim
December 2016

Social Security Taxes Will Nick More of Your Earnings in 2017

The maximum amount of earnings on which you pay Social Security taxes is rising to $127,200, up from $118,500 in 2016.

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