Amazon Prime Day II a Rousing Success (Says Amazon)

The online retailer’s Prime Early Access Sale sold more than 100 million items in the two-day event designed to kick-start the 2022 holiday shopping season – very early.

Amazon packages sit on a front porch of a home
(Image credit: Getty Images)

 

Amazon’s first ever Prime Early Access Sale, an October event to mirror July’s Amazon Prime Day, brought big numbers to the online retailer and helped some shoppers get an early start on their holiday gift lists – or themselves.

Amazon on Thursday said the two-day event, held Tuesday and Wednesday (Oct. 11-12), saw more than 100 million items go out the door worldwide (Amazon hasn’t released sales figures yet). The event targets Amazon Prime members, a new perk added to the membership benefits.

Subscribe to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance

Be a smarter, better informed investor.

Save up to 74%
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/xrd7fjmf8g1657008683.png

Sign up for Kiplinger’s Free E-Newsletters

Profit and prosper with the best of Kiplinger’s expert advice on investing, taxes, retirement, personal finance and more - straight to your e-mail.

Profit and prosper with the best of Kiplinger’s expert advice - straight to your e-mail.

Sign up

The hottest categories for shoppers (and Amazon) included clothing, toys, home goods and, of course, Amazon’s own devices such as Echo, Ring video doorbells and flying home-security cameras, Audible and now also iRobot (maker of the Roomba), a perennial winner (and deeply discounted) for prior Amazon Prime Days.

“Our Prime Early Access Sale was a great kickoff to the holidays, and the best part is that it’s only the beginning,” said Doug Herrington, CEO of Amazon Worldwide Stores. “Customers will find millions of must-have deals throughout the season that will help them continue to save money on gifts for loved ones.”

The most popular products during Prime Early Access Sale included the Macbook Air M1 (opens in new tab), with a surprising discount rarely seen on Apple products; Bose earbuds and headphones; the Peloton bike (opens in new tab); Casper pillows and toppers; and Shark hair dryers, vacuums, and air purifiers. LANEIGE Lip Sleeping Mask, Apple AirPods (2nd Generation), Vital Proteins Collagen Peptides, and Crest 3D Whitestrips Professional Effects Teeth Whitening Strips (opens in new tab) were hot items in the U.S.

Best-selling holiday items and décor items sold in the U.S. included wreaths, garlands, decorative lights, and Halloween costumes, because why not holiday costumes?

Other major retailers, competitors to Amazon that include Walmart, offered ancillary sales around Amazon’s October event, like Walmart’s Rollbacks and More (Oct. 10-13) and Target’s Deal Days (Oct. 6-8).

How the October sales events for all retailers shake out for the holiday shopping season remains to be seen. Kiplinger is forecasting a “meh” season for retailers, with profits peeling off of inflation-fueled price increases rather than sales volume. The forecast is retailers will see only a 1% increase in sales, after inflation.

For inflation-weary shoppers, however, big discounts could be in the offing as retailers seek to dispose of warehouse-clogging inventory. Last-minute shoppers should rule; Christmas Eve is on a Saturday this year, and malls are seeing a post-Covid comeback in foot traffic.

Bob Niedt
Online Editor, Kiplinger.com

Bob is a Senior Online Editor at Kiplinger.com. He has more than 40 years of experience in online, print and visual journalism. Bob has worked as an award-winning writer and editor in the Washington, D.C., market as well as at news organizations in New York, Michigan and California. Bob joined Kiplinger in 2016, bringing a wealth of expertise covering retail, entertainment, and money-saving trends and topics. He was one of the first journalists at a daily news organization to aggressively cover retail as a specialty, and has been lauded in the retail industry for his expertise. Bob has also been an adjunct and associate professor of print, online and visual journalism at Syracuse University and Ithaca College. He has a master’s degree from Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications and a bachelor’s degree in communications and theater from Hope College.