14 Stocks Already Hurt by President Donald Trump's Tariffs

America's nearly two-year-old trade war with China, as well as salvos with Europe and Mexico, has battered a wide swath of stocks.

Freight transportation concept, cargo containers with USA and China flags hoisted by crane hooks on blue cloudy sky background
(Image credit: Getty Images)

America's nearly two-year-old trade war with China, as well as salvos with Europe and Mexico, has battered a wide swath of stocks. President Donald Trump’s tariffs (and retaliatory duties) have weighed on companies in various forms, such as higher input costs and unsold inventory.

The pinch is being felt on a wide scale. Global growth was already slowing, though market analysts and foreign leaders alike think the trade war is making things worse. Here at home, manufacturing is thinning, reflecting waning demand. ISM’s purchasing managers’ index reading for August was just 49.1. Anything under 50 signals a contraction in activity, meaning August was the first month in three years that American manufacturing receded.

The result has been a pullback in numerous stocks. Buying these tariff-assisted dips is risky because some of the companies face headwinds outside of trade uncertainty. But a resolution between the U.S. and China would bring much-needed relief to many companies, and perhaps a bounceback in their shares. You can see the potential every time the market rallies on the smallest of optimistic hints.

“(These) value stocks will deliver attractive returns after the tariff resolution, like a coiled spring that pops up," says Michael Underhill, chief investment officer of Capital Innovations in Pewaukee, Wisconsin. He thinks the market could continue to move higher heading into October’s negotiations. If more concrete progress is made, a sustained rally will continue, he says.

Here, then, are 14 stocks that have already felt the burn from President Donald Trump’s tariffs (and retaliatory taxes). Some represent potential should Washington reel in its tariff threats, but they may continue to suffer any time trade tensions reignite. And a few are trying to pivot their businesses out of harm's way.

Data is as of Sept. 12. Dividend yields are calculated by annualizing the most recent quarterly payout and dividing by the share price. Analyst opinions provided by The Wall Street Journal.

Contributing Writer, Kiplinger.com
Ellen Chang is a freelance journalist who is based in Houston and writes articles for TheStreet and U.S. News & World Report. Chang focuses her articles on stocks, personal finance, energy and cybersecurity. Her byline has appeared in national business publications, including USA Today, CBS News, Yahoo Finance and MSN Money. She is a proud graduate of Purdue University and a lover of random acts of kindness, volunteering and cats and dogs. Follow her on Twitter at @ellenychang and Instagram at @ellenyinchang.