How Students Can Improve Their Chances of Getting a Job

Follow these tips to be prepared when you enter the labor force.

This summer hasn’t been an especially productive one for working teenagers. After a strong start in May, teen employment faltered, and total employment gains through the end of July ended up 3% lower than last summer, according to an analysis of government data by Challenger, Gray & Christmas, a global outplacement firm. Overall, reports Challenger, only 43% of 16- to-19-year-olds were employed or actively seeking employment, compared with more than 70% in 1980.

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Janet Bodnar
Contributor

Janet Bodnar is editor-at-large of Kiplinger's Personal Finance, a position she assumed after retiring as editor of the magazine after eight years at the helm. She is a nationally recognized expert on the subjects of women and money, children's and family finances, and financial literacy. She is the author of two books, Money Smart Women and Raising Money Smart Kids. As editor-at-large, she writes two popular columns for Kiplinger, "Money Smart Women" and "Living in Retirement." Bodnar is a graduate of St. Bonaventure University and is a member of its Board of Trustees. She received her master's degree from Columbia University, where she was also a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Business and Economics Journalism.