Economic Forecasts

Interest Rates: Potential Additional Fiscal Stimulus a Boost for Long Rates

Kiplinger’s latest forecast on interest rates

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note just got an extra boost with the Democrats’ win in the Georgia Senate races. With razor-thin control of the Senate, plus the House of Representatives and the White House, Democrats are in a position to pass more stimulus legislation, such as $2,000 payments to individuals and aid to state and local governments. This boost to economic growth tends to push up interest rates as, as the demand for funds grows and inflation possibly ticks up, as well. But larger budget deficits will also raise rates, as the supply of government debt offered to investors grows. The 10-year rate is currently at 1.1%. Expect it to rise to near 2% by the end of the year.

The rise in the 10-year rate will also push up mortgage rates, from 2.7% currently to 3.5% by the end of the year. The upward drift may cause some panic home buying as buyers rush to lock in a low mortgage rate, giving an extra boost to the rise in home prices. Rates on long-term car loans should also bump up a bit.

Short-term consumer loan rates such as home equity lines of credit will stay where they are. These tend to be tied to the federal funds interest rate, which is controlled by the Federal Reserve and which will be held constant for an extended period of time.

The Federal Reserve at its most recent FOMC meeting recommitted itself to keeping short-term interest rates near zero for the foreseeable future, which likely means through 2024. The Fed is also continuing to purchase $80 billion of Treasury securities and $40 billion of mortgage-backed securities every month, adding to its balance sheet. The Fed is “all in” to do whatever it takes to support the economy. Its statement said that it will be willing to tolerate inflation levels above 2% for a time. That means that the Fed will not raise short-term rates even if inflation begins to pick up, but left unspecified when it would act to curb inflation.

Corporate high-yield bond rates have continued to ease, perhaps indicating greater business confidence. CCC-rated bond yields are at 8.3%, down from 11.7% at the end of October, and have closed the gap slightly with higher-rated bonds. AAA bonds yielded 1.7% and BBB bonds, 2.16%.

Source: Federal Reserve Open Market Committee

Most Popular

How a Third Stimulus Check Could Differ From the First and Second Payments
Coronavirus and Your Money

How a Third Stimulus Check Could Differ From the First and Second Payments

There's a big push in Washington for a third round of stimulus payments. But the amount and eligibility rules for your third stimulus check could be d…
January 27, 2021
Where's My Stimulus Check? Use the IRS's "Get My Payment" Portal to Get an Answer
Coronavirus and Your Money

Where's My Stimulus Check? Use the IRS's "Get My Payment" Portal to Get an Answer

The IRS has an online tool that lets you track the status of your second stimulus check.
January 18, 2021
Biden's Stimulus Plan Includes $3,000 Child Tax Credits
Coronavirus and Your Money

Biden's Stimulus Plan Includes $3,000 Child Tax Credits

The president is calling for a temporary tax credit of $3,000 per child (more for younger children).
January 27, 2021