Tool | November 2018

What's My Social Security Full Retirement Age?

Precisely when you become eligible to receive your full, unreduced Social Security retirement benefit depends on the year of your birth. Use our calculator to determine your full retirement age.

Your full retirement age is the age at which you are eligible to receive 100% of your Social Security retirement benefit. When the Social Security Act was signed into law in 1935, the retirement age was 65. But in 1983, a law was passed to gradually increase the retirement age to 67.

SEE ALSO: 37 States That Don't Tax Social Security Benefits

Today, you can claim your retirement benefit as early as age 62, ahead of your full retirement age, but the benefit amount will be reduced if you do. You need to wait until your full retirement age, also known as your normal retirement age, to receive 100% of your benefit.

When is your FULL retirement age?
It depends on the year you were born.

Enter your 4-digit birth year below:


Your full retirement age is:

Note: If your birthday is January 1st, the Social Security Administration uses the previous year to determine your full retirement age. Example: If your birthday is Jan. 1, 1960, the year used to determine your full retirement age is 1959.

Claiming Social Security Early Reduces Benefits

Just how much your benefit will be reduced depends on your precise age when you claim Social Security early. Let’s say your full retirement age – the age at which you are eligible for 100% of your benefit – is 67, as it is for anyone born in 1960 or later. Here’s how it works:

  • If you claim Social Security early at age 62, your benefit will be reduced by 30%
  • If you claim early at age 63, your benefit will be reduced by 25%
  • If you claim early at age 64, your benefit will be reduced by 20%
  • If you claim early at age 65, your benefit will be reduced by 13.3%
  • If you claim early at age 66, your benefit will be reduced by 6.7%

In this example, according to the Social Security Administration, if you would have been eligible for a Social Security retirement benefit of $1,000 a month at your full retirement age of 67, the benefit is reduced to $700 a month if you claim early at age 62; $750 if you claim at 63; and so on. Note that the reduction is calculated on a monthly basis, not an annual basis, so every month you wait beyond age 62 will net you a slightly bigger monthly check from Social Security.

Claiming Social Security After Your Full Retirement Age Boosts Benefits

Conversely, Uncle Sam will reward you with a bigger monthly check if you wait to claim Social Security until after you reach your full retirement age. These delayed retirement credits will accumulate monthly up until age 70. There’s no incentive to wait beyond age 70 to claim Social Security. Here’s how much your benefit will increase if you delay claiming Social Security:

  • If you delay claiming until age 68, your benefit will increase by 8%
  • If you delay claiming until age 69, your benefit will increase by 16%
  • If you delay claiming Social Security until age 70, your benefit will increase by 24%

In this example, if you would have been eligible for a Social Security retirement benefit of $1,000 a month at your full retirement age of 67, the benefit is increased to $1,080 if you delay claiming until age 68; $1,160 if you delay to age 69; and $1,240 if you delay to age 70. Again, the delayed retirement credits accrue monthly, not annually, so every month you wait beyond age 67 will net you a slightly bigger monthly check from Social Security.

SEE ALSO: True or False: Test Your Knowledge of Social Security Claiming Strategies

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