How Can Women Worried About Retirement Stay on Track?

Developing a resilient long-term plan is more important than ever as more women fear being blindsided by outside events despite doing all the right things.

A couple of retired women laugh while sitting on a cabinet together listening to vinyl records.
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Today’s macroeconomic environment is scary — causing many investors to be nervous about their path to financial security in retirement. This is particularly true for women, who face notable barriers in saving for and funding their retirements. Wage gaps, time out of the workforce to care for their family or children and longer life spans mean that it’s even more important for women to develop a long-term plan before it’s too late.

Women Anticipate Retirement Turbulence and Adjust Accordingly

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Kristi Martin Rodriguez
Senior Vice President, Nationwide Retirement Institute, Nationwide

Kristi Martin Rodriguez currently serves as Senior Vice President of the Nationwide Retirement Institute® for Nationwide Financial, leading the teams responsible for advocating for and educating members, partners and industry leaders on issues impacting their ability to have a secure financial future. She was a founding member of the Ohio chapter of The National Association of Securities Professionals (NASP), an organization helping people of color and women achieve inclusion in the industry.