social security

What's My Social Security Full Retirement Age?

The year you were born determines when you become eligible for your full Social Security retirement benefit. Use our calculator to determine your full retirement age.

Waiting until your full retirement age to collect Social Security can have a big financial payoff.  

If you wait until your full retirement age, you are eligible to collect 100% of your Social Security retirement benefit. Initially, when the Social Security Act was signed into law in 1935, that age was 65. However, a law passed in 1983 gradually increased the retirement age to 67. You do have the option to take your benefits early, which will reduce your checks, or delay until past your full retirement age, netting you a bigger benefit. 

Insert related link: Social Security Basics: 12 Things You Must Know About Claiming and Maximizing Your Social Security Benefit

When is your FULL retirement age?

It depends on the year you were born.

Enter your 4-digit birth year below:

Your full retirement age is:

Note: If your birthday is January 1st, the Social Security Administration uses the previous year to determine your full retirement age. Example: If your birthday is Jan. 1, 1960, the year used to determine your full retirement age is 1959.

Claiming Social Security Early Reduces Benefits

You can claim your Social Security retirement benefits as early as 62 but you will receive a smaller amount if you do that. How much your benefits will be reduced depends on your age when you claim Social Security. For example, let’s say you are eligible for 100% of your benefits at age 67, which is the full retirement age for anyone born in or after 1960: 

  • If you claim Social Security early at age 62, your benefit will be reduced by 30%
  • If you claim early at age 63, your benefit will be reduced by 25%
  • If you claim early at age 64, your benefit will be reduced by 20%
  • If you claim early at age 65, your benefit will be reduced by 13.3%
  • If you claim early at age 66, your benefit will be reduced by 6.7%

Under this example, if you were eligible for $1,000 a month at your full retirement age of 67 then the benefit would be reduced to $700 a month if you claimed at 62; $750 if you claimed at 63; and so on, according to the Social Security Administration. The reduction is calculated each month, not on a yearly basis, so every month you wait after age 62 will mean a slightly bigger Social Security check. 

Claiming Social Security After Your Full Retirement Age Increases Benefits

You can also wait as late as age 70 to start collecting Social Security benefits. Doing so boosts your retirement benefits. There’s no incentive to wait after age 70 to claim Social Security. 

Here’s how your benefit will increase if you wait to claim Social Security:

  • If you delay claiming until age 68, your benefit will increase by 8%
  • If you delay claiming until age 69, your benefit will increase by 16%
  • If you delay claiming Social Security until age 70, your benefit will increase by 24%

Using this example, if you were eligible for a Social Security retirement benefit of $1,000 per month at your full retirement age of 67, the benefit would increase to $1,080 if you delay claiming until age 68; $1,160 if you delay to age 69; and $1,240 if you delay to age 70. 

Once again, the delayed retirement credits accrue monthly, not annually, so every month you wait beyond age 67 will net you a slightly bigger monthly check from Social Security.

Most Popular

Your Guide to Roth Conversions
Special Report
Tax Breaks

Your Guide to Roth Conversions

A Kiplinger Special Report
February 25, 2021
How to Calculate the Break-Even Age for Taking Social Security
social security

How to Calculate the Break-Even Age for Taking Social Security

When it comes to maximizing your Social Security benefits, there are many elements to consider. One factor that can be especially enlightening is your…
August 30, 2021
Spend Without Worry in Retirement
Financial Planning

Spend Without Worry in Retirement

Fears of running out of money prevent many retirees from tapping the nest egg they’ve worked a lifetime to save. With these strategies, you can genera…
August 30, 2021

Recommended

How Exactly Do You Stress-Test Your Financial Plan?
retirement planning

How Exactly Do You Stress-Test Your Financial Plan?

Some tasks are not good for DIYers, and stress-testing your portfolio is probably one of them. Because individuals don’t have access to the same tools…
September 18, 2021
What Is the Social Security COLA?
retirement

What Is the Social Security COLA?

This year especially, cost-of-living adjustments are late to the party, as consumers are feeling the effect of price spikes now.
September 16, 2021
Retirees Likely to Receive Significant Bump in Social Security Benefits in 2022
social security

Retirees Likely to Receive Significant Bump in Social Security Benefits in 2022

The cost-of-living adjustment for Social Security benefits for next year is expected to be the largest since 1982.
September 16, 2021
5 Key Points to Consider Before You Claim Social Security
social security

5 Key Points to Consider Before You Claim Social Security

The big decision every retiree has to make is when to start taking their Social Security benefits. Here are five things to think about as you weigh yo…
September 16, 2021