What's My Social Security Full Retirement Age?

The year you were born determines when you become eligible for your full Social Security retirement benefit. Use our calculator to determine your full retirement age.

A picture of a Social Security benefits application.
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Waiting until your full retirement age to collect Social Security can have a big financial payoff.

If you wait until your full retirement age, you are eligible to collect 100% of your Social Security retirement benefit. Initially, when the Social Security Act was signed into law in 1935, that age was 65. However, a law passed in 1983 gradually increased the retirement age to 67. You do have the option to take your benefits early, which will reduce your checks, or delay until past your full retirement age, netting you a bigger benefit.

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Claiming Social Security Early Reduces Benefits

You can claim your Social Security retirement benefits as early as 62 but you will receive a smaller amount if you do that. How much your benefits will be reduced depends on your age when you claim Social Security. For example, let’s say you are eligible for 100% of your benefits at age 67, which is the full retirement age for anyone born in or after 1960:

  • If you claim Social Security early at age 62, your benefit will be reduced by 30%
  • If you claim early at age 63, your benefit will be reduced by 25%
  • If you claim early at age 64, your benefit will be reduced by 20%
  • If you claim early at age 65, your benefit will be reduced by 13.3%
  • If you claim early at age 66, your benefit will be reduced by 6.7%

Under this example, if you were eligible for $1,000 a month at your full retirement age of 67 then the benefit would be reduced to $700 a month if you claimed at 62; $750 if you claimed at 63; and so on, according to the Social Security Administration. The reduction is calculated each month, not on a yearly basis, so every month you wait after age 62 will mean a slightly bigger Social Security check.

Claiming Social Security After Your Full Retirement Age Increases Benefits

You can also wait as late as age 70 to start collecting Social Security benefits. Doing so boosts your retirement benefits. There’s no incentive to wait after age 70 to claim Social Security.

Here’s how your benefit will increase if you wait to claim Social Security:

  • If you delay claiming until age 68, your benefit will increase by 8%
  • If you delay claiming until age 69, your benefit will increase by 16%
  • If you delay claiming Social Security until age 70, your benefit will increase by 24%

Using this example, if you were eligible for a Social Security retirement benefit of $1,000 per month at your full retirement age of 67, the benefit would increase to $1,080 if you delay claiming until age 68; $1,160 if you delay to age 69; and $1,240 if you delay to age 70.

Once again, the delayed retirement credits accrue monthly, not annually, so every month you wait beyond age 67 will net you a slightly bigger monthly check from Social Security.

Senior Retirement Editor, Kiplinger.com

Jackie Stewart is the senior retirement editor for Kiplinger.com and the senior editor for Kiplinger's Retirement Report.