Income Investors Should Look Beyond the Ukraine Invasion

Unless you invested in a Russian-themed ETF or an emerging markets index fund, the destruction of Moscow's capital markets is a distraction for investors.

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The politico who uttered "never let a good crisis go to waste" might have been onto something. This is not to sound insensitive to Ukraine and all victims, but without an impending U.S. recession, credit crunch, dividend cuts or an explosion of bad debt, there is little reason for portfolio pessimism.

Unless you invested in a Russian-themed exchange-traded fund or maybe an emerging-markets index fund, the destruction of Moscow's capital markets is a sideshow.

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Jeffrey R. Kosnett
Senior Editor, Kiplinger's Personal Finance
Kosnett is the editor of Kiplinger's Investing for Income and writes the "Cash in Hand" column for Kiplinger's Personal Finance. He is an income-investing expert who covers bonds, real estate investment trusts, oil and gas income deals, dividend stocks and anything else that pays interest and dividends. He joined Kiplinger in 1981 after six years in newspapers, including the Baltimore Sun. He is a 1976 journalism graduate from the Medill School at Northwestern University and completed an executive program at the Carnegie-Mellon University business school in 1978.