When Online Investing Turns Deadly: Lessons from a Robinhood Trader’s Suicide

Gamification of financial apps can make investing fun, but unsophisticated investors can get in over their heads if they aren’t careful.

(Image credit: Getty Images)

As an advocate for young adults prudently beginning their investing journey as soon as possible, I’ve found it difficult to shake this recent story: A young man from Illinois took his own life less than 24 hours after checking his Robinhood account and seeing a negative cash balance of over $730,000.

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Owner, WealthUp

Riley Adams, CPA, is originally from New Orleans but now lives in the San Francisco Bay Area, where he works as a senior financial analyst at Google. He is also the founder of WealthUp, a personal finance website where people of all ages can learn about money, discover their financial selves, and develop the skills they need to grow their nest egg.