13 High-Yield Dividend Stocks to Watch

High-yield dividend stocks have gained even more allure lately in the face of shrinking bond yields.

Close-up view of stack of US dollars.
(Image credit: Getty Images)

High-yield dividend stocks have gained even more allure lately in the face of shrinking bond yields. However, while a handful are ready buys right now, several more sport alluring yields – at least 5%, and up into the double digits – but need a little more time to simmer before it’s time to dip in.

Patience is a virtue in life. That’s particularly true in the investing world. It’s even true across investing disciplines. Sober value investors wait for their price before buying, but disciplined market technicians also know to wait for the proper setup before trading.

Sometimes, you need to wait for a fundamental catalyst to make your trade worth making. Other times, it’s simply a matter of waiting for the right price. But the key is having the self-control to wait for your moment. Lack of patience can be a portfolio killer.

“We tell our clients during the onboarding process that we won’t be investing their entire portfolio on day one,” explains Chase Robertson, Managing Partner of Houston-based RIA Robertson Wealth Management. “We tend to average into our portfolios over time as market conditions warrant, and we’re not opposed to having large cash positions. Our clients thank us in the end.”

Today, we’re going to look at 13 high-yield dividend stocks to keep on your watch list. All are stocks yielding over 5% that you probably could buy today, but all have their own unique quirks that might make it more prudent to watch them a little longer rather than jump in with both feet.

Data is as of Aug. 14. Dividend yields are calculated by annualizing the most recent payout and dividing by the share price.

Charles Lewis Sizemore, CFA
Contributing Writer, Kiplinger.com

Charles Lewis Sizemore, CFA is the Chief Investment Officer of Sizemore Capital Management LLC, a registered investment advisor based in Dallas, Texas, where he specializes in dividend-focused portfolios and in building alternative allocations with minimal correlation to the stock market.