3 Key Things to Consider Before Agreeing to Be a Guardian in a Trust

You might be surprised at how many questions arise surrounding financial issues, legal arrangements and lifestyle choices.

A woman who agreed to be a guardian in a trust sits with a child on her lap.
(Image credit: Getty Images)

While it’s an honor to be asked to be the guardian of someone else’s children in the event of a tragedy, there are three key considerations before agreeing to be named guardian in estate documents.

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Kara Duckworth, CFP®, CDFA®
Managing Director of Client Experience, Mercer Advisors

Kara Duckworth is the Managing Director of Client Experience at Mercer Advisors and also leads the company’s InvestHERs program, focused on providing financial planning to serve the specific needs of women. She is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER and Certified Divorce Financial Analyst®. She is a frequent public speaker on financial planning topics and has been quoted in numerous industry publications.