Understanding a New Supreme Court’s Impact on Consumers, Savers and Investors

With the arrival of Amy Coney Barrett on the bench and a new president set for inauguration, what could that mean for American businesses and the American people themselves?

The exterior of the Supreme Court building.
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Decisions by the Supreme Court have a direct impact on consumers, savers and investors, and a president’s ability to act without Congress. We often think only of landmark Supreme Court cases affecting social policy or balancing the president’s and Congress’ differences, but the Supreme Court also plays a significant role in businesses’ relationships with their employees and customers, requiring arbitration over disputes and limiting opportunities for class action lawsuits and whistleblower protections.

Role and Relevance of the Courts

Subscribe to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance

Be a smarter, better informed investor.

Save up to 74%
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/hwgJ7osrMtUWhk5koeVme7-200-80.png

Sign up for Kiplinger’s Free E-Newsletters

Profit and prosper with the best of expert advice on investing, taxes, retirement, personal finance and more - straight to your e-mail.

Profit and prosper with the best of expert advice - straight to your e-mail.

Sign up
Disclaimer

This article was written by and presents the views of our contributing adviser, not the Kiplinger editorial staff. You can check adviser records with the SEC or with FINRA.

To continue reading this article
please register for free

This is different from signing in to your print subscription


Why am I seeing this? Find out more here

Steven L. Skancke, Ph.D.
Chief Economic Adviser, Keel Point LLC

Dr. Steven L. Skancke is Chief Economic Adviser at Keel Point, a $2.5 billion wealth management firm. Prior to 2007, Dr. Skancke was for 24 years a Washington, D.C.-based merchant banker. Dr. Skancke served on the White House National Security Council staff of Presidents Nixon and Ford and on the U.S. Treasury and White House Cabinet Council on Economic Affairs teams of Presidents Carter and Reagan.  He is a GWU adjunct professor and the co-author of two books.