37 Ways to Invest for High Yields While We Wait for the Fed to Move

Kiplinger found enticing yields in nine categories, ranging from 3% to 12%, depending on risk.

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It almost feels as though we’re all Fed watchers now. From March 2022 to July 2023, the Federal Reserve Board hoisted the federal funds rate (the rate banks charge each other for overnight loans) by 5.25 percentage points in a bid to crush inflation. The inflation rate is down considerably but still a bit sticky, staying around 3%, and the economy continues to power ahead. Yet the Fed has signaled that it expects to cut rates in 2024 — it just hasn’t said when it will embark on its rate-cutting cycle. So now we’re waiting. 

While we wait, some enticing yields are on offer across a wide range of asset classes for income-hungry investors — and, for a change, that includes bonds, a core income-producing asset. “One overarching theme is that fixed income is kind of back to normal, which means back to a world we haven’t seen in 15 years,” says Simeon Hyman, global investment strategist at ProShares. 

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Contributing Writer, Kiplinger's Personal Finance

Andrew Tanzer is an editorial consultant and investment writer. After working as a journalist for 25 years at magazines that included Forbes and Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, he served as a senior research analyst and investment writer at a leading New York-based financial advisor. Andrew currently writes for several large hedge and mutual funds, private wealth advisors, and a major bank. He earned a BA in East Asian Studies from Wesleyan University, an MS in Journalism from the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, and holds both CFA and CFP® designations.