Those Quirky Investors On Capitol Hill

A look at lawmakers' finances finds investing blindspots, a few biases and some eclectic bets.

Those who say the U.S. should place a higher priority on teaching financial literacy need look no further than our own lawmakers for supporting evidence. In June, Congress released the personal financial disclosures of its members, detailing their investment holdings, sources of income and debts for 2011.

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Elizabeth Leary
Contributing Editor, Kiplinger's Personal Finance
Elizabeth Leary (née Ody) first joined Kiplinger in 2006 as a reporter, and has held various positions on staff and as a contributor in the years since. Her writing has also appeared in Barron's, BloombergBusinessweek, The Washington Post and other outlets.