business

Small-Business Success Story: How Shark Tank Helped Lollaland Grow

The television show provided an infusion of cash to expand this couple’s family business.

Kiplinger's spoke with Hannah and Mark Lim (pictured at left), owners of Lollaland, a Monrovia, Calif.-based company that makes specialty products for children, about why they decided to start their own business. Read on for an excerpt from our interview:

See Our Slide Show: 6 Surprisingly Simple Ideas That Made Millions

Hanna, where did you get your idea? I had been a high school chemistry teacher, but I was staying home with our first daughter, Story, now age 7. She found it difficult to drink from a sippy cup with a spill-proof valve, but if I held a cup with a straw to her mouth, she could drink just fine. I wanted a cup with a straw that would allow her to capture all the liquid from the bottom. Plus, I wanted it to be made in the U.S. from kid-safe plastic. My husband, Mark, who was studying for his MBA, encouraged me to write a business plan using one of his textbooks as a guide. If the plan was viable, he would join me in executing it after he graduated. I wrote a 35-page plan.

Why “Lollaland”? Our daughter asked for her “lolla” cup—her water cup—and we decided to broaden the idea as our company name.

Did you design the cup? No. I Googled “industrial design + LA area” and interviewed at least 10 firms. I had only $10,000 to spend on design, but the designer was intrigued by our small project and agreed to take it on. I found our manufacturer the same way. I think my business plan persuaded both companies that I was serious. We spent $5,000 to $6,000 to hire a patent attorney, who helped us obtain our design patent and trademarks. We spent another $1,000 to create a prototype of the cup. On our first manufacturing run, we ordered the minimum of 3,000 units, which cost about $4.50 per cup. If we had gone to China, they would have cost about $1 apiece.

How did you sell the cup? In October 2010, we got our first orders at a baby-product trade show. We live in the Los Angeles area, which has lots of high-end baby boutiques and gift shops, so I also went door-to-door with a box of samples in my car and opened 50 accounts. Now we have 800 accounts across the U.S. (The cup also sells for $16 at www.lollaland.com.)

Where did you get the money? Our parents, immigrants from Korea, always told us to save. Plus, neither of us had any student-loan debt. So we pulled $100,000 from our savings and took a small-business loan for $60,000 from a local lender, using our townhouse for collateral. We moved in with my in-laws and rented out our house.

You presented your idea on the TV show Shark Tank? We were desperate for more money to pay for another production run, and my husband suggested that we audition. We asked for $100,000 in exchange for a 15% stake. We were on TV for maybe 10 minutes [the episode aired in April 2012], but we negotiated with the investors for 90 minutes. Mark Cuban and Robert Herjavec gave us the $100,000, but each took 20%. That was painful, but Mark Cuban has been especially responsive and has mentored us with tough love.

Are you making a living? We had about $1 million in gross sales in 2014 and hope to double that in 2015. Neither of us took a salary for the first two years, but now we take very modest ones.

What’s next? Now we’re also selling a three-piece mealtime set [$20] that was inspired by our second child, Sofia, 6, and we’re developing a glass baby bottle with a great anti-colic nipple, inspired by our third, Zoe, 2.

Most Popular

Tax Wrinkles for Work-at-Home Employees During COVID-19
taxes

Tax Wrinkles for Work-at-Home Employees During COVID-19

Are your home office expenses deductible? How does going out of state to work for a while affect your tax picture? There are some interesting wrinkles…
November 9, 2020
Retirement: It All Starts with a Budget
personal finance

Retirement: It All Starts with a Budget

When you’re meeting with your financial planner, do you talk about your budget? If not, you should.
November 10, 2020
Will Joe Biden Raise YOUR Taxes?
taxes

Will Joe Biden Raise YOUR Taxes?

During the campaign, Joe Biden promised that he would raise taxes for some people. Will you be one of them?
November 10, 2020

Recommended

Are You Liable When a Customer’s Hummer Gets Stolen from Your Parking Lot?
small business

Are You Liable When a Customer’s Hummer Gets Stolen from Your Parking Lot?

A motel stay led to an unfortunate loss for a California couple. Can they hold the motel responsible? A lawyer’s take on the situation may not leave t…
November 25, 2020
Captive Insurance for Pandemics? What Small Businesses Can Do
small business

Captive Insurance for Pandemics? What Small Businesses Can Do

The pandemic has revealed gaping holes in traditional insurance coverage for small businesses. Private insurance, including captive insurance, may be …
November 18, 2020
Dear Mom and Dad: Thanks
Making Your Money Last

Dear Mom and Dad: Thanks

Ideally, living at home should provide a way to improve your financial well-being and lay the groundwork for future success.
November 17, 2020
Give Your Budget Some Love
Budgeting

Give Your Budget Some Love

Think of it as a flexible tool to prioritize—and achieve—your goals.
November 17, 2020