Marriage: When You’d Rather Not

Same-sex couples planning for a long-term commitment need to have the right estate planning documents in place, whether they are married or not.

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(Image credit: Getty Images)

Since gay marriage was legalized in 2015, same-sex couples have had the same rights as their opposite sex counterparts when it comes to tying their financial lives together. All couples can now take advantage of tax benefits for married partners, pass assets from one spouse to another with ease and qualify for Social Security spousal and survivor benefits. However, not all couples want to get married. Others have remarried and haven’t updated their estate planning documents. Here are things same-sex couples need to consider:

Write a Will

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Rivan V. Stinson
Ex-staff writer, Kiplinger's Personal Finance

Rivan joined Kiplinger on Leap Day 2016 as a reporter for Kiplinger's Personal Finance magazine. A Michigan native, she graduated from the University of Michigan in 2014 and from there freelanced as a local copy editor and proofreader, and served as a research assistant to a local Detroit journalist. Her work has been featured in the Ann Arbor Observer and Sage Business Researcher. She is currently assistant editor, personal finance at The Washington Post.