How to Avoid Annoying Hotel Fees: Per Person, Parking and More

Here's some expert advice on how to avoid extra hotel fees. Don't get stuck paying for amenities that you don't use.

A couple relax on a hotel bed.
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Currently planning a summer vacation? If so, you've no doubt been browsing places to stay in order to find the hotel with the best amenities at the right price. But comparing actual hotel prices can prove to be tricky, and hidden hotel fees are to blame. Hotel fees and surcharges emerged as an industry practice in 1997, and they can eat up a large portion of your vacation budget if you're not careful. In fact, you might not even have been aware of the fees hotels charged until after you've booked a room or received your bill at checkout, says Anne Banas, executive editor of SmarterTravel.com

However, this could soon change. A new bill, the Hotel Fees Transparency Act, has been introduced by U.S. Senators Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) and Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), requiring anyone advertising a hotel room or short-term rental to clearly show the final price a customer will pay. The FTC has also proposed a rule to ban junk fees, which they refer to as "hidden and bogus fees that can harm consumers and undercut honest businesses."

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Cameron Huddleston
Former Online Editor, Kiplinger.com

Award-winning journalist, speaker, family finance expert, and author of Mom and Dad, We Need to Talk.

Cameron Huddleston wrote the daily "Kip Tips" column for Kiplinger.com. She joined Kiplinger in 2001 after graduating from American University with an MA in economic journalism.

With contributions from