Build an Action Plan For Alzheimer’s

Creating an action blueprint can give you some control over the future as your disease progresses.

Senior couple doing paperwork at home
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People who are newly diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease typically experience a tsunami of emotions: disbelief, fear, anger, depression, sense of loss. But after the initial shock, a person can assert some control over the future by creating an action blueprint that will guide the patient and caregivers as the disease progresses. “When someone is still in the early stages, it’s a gift to family members to prepare and to build support right away,” says Deb Bryer, early-stage coordinator of the St. Louis, Mo., chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association.

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Susan B. Garland
Contributing Editor, Kiplinger's Retirement Report
Susan Garland is the former editor of Kiplinger's Retirement Report, a personal finance publication whose subscribers are retirees and those approaching retirement. Before joining Kiplinger in 2006, Garland was a freelance writer whose work appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, BusinessWeek, Modern Maturity (now AARP The Magazine), Fortune Small Business and other publications. For 12 years, Garland was a Washington-based correspondent for BusinessWeek, covering the White House, national politics, social policy and legal affairs. Garland is a graduate of Colgate University.