Battling Age Bias When Job Hunting

Finding a new job later in life can present some challenges when it comes to age discrimination. Here's how to combat them.

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Older workers who are job hunting, perhaps to switch careers or pursue "bridge" jobs before full retirement, have a wealth of experience to draw on. But how can you ensure that the positive attributes of a long career, such as building knowledge and honing skills, don't morph into the negative headwinds of age discrimination? Happily, there are steps you can take, from tightening your résumé to prepping for interviews, to battle age bias head on.

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Mary Kane
Associate Editor, Kiplinger's Retirement Report
Mary Kane is a financial writer and editor who has specialized in covering fringe financial services, such as payday loans and prepaid debit cards. She has written or edited for Reuters, the Washington Post, BillMoyers.com, MSNBC, Scripps Media Center, and more. She also was an Alicia Patterson Fellow, focusing on consumer finance and financial literacy, and a national correspondent for Newhouse Newspapers in Washington, DC. She covered the subprime mortgage crisis for the pathbreaking online site The Washington Independent, and later served as its editor. She is a two-time winner of the Excellence in Financial Journalism Awards sponsored by the New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants. She also is an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University, where she teaches a course on journalism and publishing in the digital age. She came to Kiplinger in March 2017.