Another Plus for High-Deductible Health Insurance Plans

New rules for plans with health savings accounts could trim your out-of-pocket costs.

(Image credit: (C)JGI/Jamie Grill/Blend Images LLC ((C)JGI/Jamie Grill/Blend Images LLC (Photographer) - [None])

High-deductible health insurance plans with health savings accounts could become more attractive to people with chronic illnesses. Until recently, people who enrolled in high-deductible plans had to pay for the medications and services used to manage their conditions, such as diabetes and heart disease, until they met their plan’s annual deductible (up to $1,350 for individual coverage or $2,700 for family coverage in 2019) before their insurer would cover treatment.

This summer, in response to an executive order from the White House, the IRS added 14 treatments and services for a range of chronic health conditions to the list of items that insurers may provide as preventive-care benefits under high-deductible plans with health savings accounts. People with the named conditions may now be able to receive certain treatments at no cost or at a lower cost, depending on their insurance plan or employer.

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Kaitlin Pitsker
Associate Editor, Kiplinger's Personal Finance
Pitsker joined Kiplinger in the summer of 2012. Previously, she interned at the Post-Standard newspaper in Syracuse, N.Y., and with Chronogram magazine in Kingston, N.Y. She holds a BS in magazine journalism from Syracuse University's S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.