Tax Breaks

IRS Gives Truckers a Tax Break in Response to the Colonial Pipeline Shutdown

The tax penalty for using dyed diesel fuel for highway use is temporarily suspended.

In response to the supply chain disruptions created by the Colonial Pipeline shutdown, the IRS is temporarily suspending the penalty for selling or using dyed diesel fuel for highway use in Alabama, Delaware, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and the District of Columbia.

Normally, dyed diesel fuel is not subject to the 24.4¢ per gallon tax that is normally applied to diesel fuel for highway use because it's only sold for tax-exempt uses, such as for farming, home heating, and local government purposes. (The fuel is dyed – often red – to distinguish it from taxable fuel.)

The penalty is typically imposed if:

  • Any dyed fuel is sold or held for sale for a use the person knows or has reason to know isn't a nontaxable use of the fuel;
  • Any dyed fuel is held for use or used for a use other than a nontaxable use and the person knew, or had reason to know, that the fuel was dyed;
  • The strength or composition of any dye in dyed fuel is willfully altered, or there is an attempt to alter it; or
  • Altered fuel is knowingly sold or held for sale for any use that isn't a nontaxable use of the fuel.

The penalty is $1,000 or $10 per gallon of the dyed diesel fuel involved, whichever is higher. For multiple violations, the $1,000 portion of the penalty increases depending on the number of violations.

The penalty relief is retroactive to May 7, 2021, and will remain in effect through May 21, 2021. It's available to any person that sells or uses dyed diesel fuel for highway use. In the case of the operator of a vehicle in which the dyed diesel fuel is used, the penalty relief is available only if the operator or the person selling the fuel pays the 24.4 cents per gallon tax that is normally applied to diesel fuel for highway use. The IRS also won't impose penalties for the failure to make semimonthly deposits of this tax.

Most Popular

Don’t Be Tricked Into Voluntarily Paying Higher Taxes on Your IRA
IRAs

Don’t Be Tricked Into Voluntarily Paying Higher Taxes on Your IRA

Traditional IRAs are set up in a way that basically incentivizes you (and your heirs) into paying the highest tax bill possible. Don’t fall for it. Co…
July 4, 2022
Your Guide to Roth Conversions
Special Report
Tax Breaks

Your Guide to Roth Conversions

A Kiplinger Special Report
February 25, 2021
Retirees, Make These Midyear Moves to Cut Next Year's Tax Bill
Tax Breaks

Retirees, Make These Midyear Moves to Cut Next Year's Tax Bill

Save money next April by making these six hot-as-July tax moves.
July 1, 2022

Recommended

Retirees, Make These Midyear Moves to Cut Next Year's Tax Bill
Tax Breaks

Retirees, Make These Midyear Moves to Cut Next Year's Tax Bill

Save money next April by making these six hot-as-July tax moves.
July 1, 2022
Biden Proposes Gas Tax Holiday, Urges States to Do the Same
Tax Breaks

Biden Proposes Gas Tax Holiday, Urges States to Do the Same

The proposed three-month federal gas tax holiday would bring down the price of gasoline slightly, while state gas tax holidays could reduce the price …
July 1, 2022
IRS Increases Mileage Rates Because of High Gas Prices
Tax Breaks

IRS Increases Mileage Rates Because of High Gas Prices

The higher mileage rates, which are used to calculate certain tax deductions for business and other uses of a car, took effect on July 1.
July 1, 2022
How 13 Types of Retirement Income Get Taxed
retirement

How 13 Types of Retirement Income Get Taxed

When you're planning for retirement, it's fun to contemplate all the travel and rounds of golf ahead of you, but don't forget about taxes.
June 30, 2022