India’s Blistering Growth is One to Watch: The Kiplinger Letter

With India’s GDP, population and infrastructure growing fast, the future looks bright for investment.

To understand current trends in the global economy and what we expect to happen in the future, our highly experienced Kiplinger Letter team will keep you abreast of the latest developments and forecasts (Get a free issue of The Kiplinger Letter or subscribe). You'll get all the latest news first by subscribing, but we will publish many (but not all) of the forecasts a few days afterward online. Here’s the latest…

China’s economy has been on a meteoric rise for decades, pulling hundreds of millions of its people out of poverty and reshaping the flow of world trade. Now, something similar is occurring in India. And unlike China, its rise is still unfolding. India’s GDP will double by about 2031, a blistering pace of growth. China’s growth has long led among major economies, but no longer. 

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Rodrigo Sermeño
, The Kiplinger Letter

Rodrigo Sermeño covers the financial services, housing, small business, and cryptocurrency industries for The Kiplinger Letter. Before joining Kiplinger in 2014, he worked for several think tanks and non-profit organizations in Washington, D.C., including the New America Foundation, the Streit Council, and the Arca Foundation. Rodrigo graduated from George Mason University with a bachelor's degree in international affairs. He also holds a master's in public policy from George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government.