Same-Sex Couples Are Marrying Less: What That Means for Their Finances

The marriage boom that bloomed after legalization appears to be cooling off. However, same-sex couples who don't marry are missing out on a lot of serious legal and financial protections.

(Image credit: NADINE STENZEL, WWW.ENINELLA.DE)

A landmark Supreme Court case in 2015 ruled once and for all that same sex-couples have a constitutional right to marry. But while marriage rates for LGBT couples jumped the year after the ruling, recent polling from Gallup indicates that they may be leveling off.

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Daniel Fan, J.D., LL.M., CFP
Director of Wealth Planning, First Foundation Advisors

Daniel Fan serves as the Director of Wealth Planning for First Foundation Advisors. Mr. Fan is a Certified Financial Planner™ and holds his Juris Doctorate and Master's in taxation from Pepperdine University School of Law and Golden Gate University respectively. He earned his Bachelor's degree from the University of California, Los Angeles.