taxes

Donate Stock or Cash to Charity?

When giving a gift, how your investment has fared will make a big difference on your taxes.

Which is better -- donate stock to a charity or donate the proceeds from selling the stock?

It depends on whether you've gained or lost money on the investment.

If the stock has increased in value since you bought it, then you'll be better off donating it to charity instead of selling it. That way, you'll avoid the capital-gains taxes on the profit. Say you bought 100 shares of a stock at $10 and it's now worth $40 per share. If you give the stock to charity, you won't have to pay the capital-gains taxes on the $3,000 in profit. If you held the stock for more than a year and are in the 15% long-term capital gains tax bracket, that move will save you $450 in taxes, which you'd owe if you sold the stock first. And if you've owned the stock for more than a year, you'll still be able to deduct its current market value -- $4,000 -- as a charitable contribution on your taxes if you itemize, like you would whether you gave stock or cash. (If you held the stock for one year or less, then you'd only be able to deduct the original $1,000 purchase price.)

If the stock has decreased in value, though, it's better to cash it in first so you can deduct the loss. If that 100 shares of stock you bought at $10 is now worth $4, for example, you'll be able to write off the $600 loss if you sell the stock before giving the money away. If you held the stock for more than a year and are in the 15% long-term capital-gains bracket, for example, that move can save you $90. And you'll still be able to deduct the value of the gift as a charitable contribution -- $400 in this case.

Before you give away stock, first make sure the charity is set up to deal with the gift. Some small charities don't have brokerage accounts and may have a tough time selling the stock or mutual funds.

Another option: Set up a donor-advised fund. You can then give the stock to the donor-advised fund, which sells the investment and gives the cash to the charity. You'll get a tax deduction for the charitable gift when you transfer the stock to the donor-advised fund, but will have unlimited time to decide which charity to support -- making it a good move if you'd like to make a donation before year-end for tax purposes but would like some extra time to select the charity. For more information about donor-advised funds, see Philanthropy Made Easy.

Most Popular

Your Guide to Roth Conversions
Special Report
Tax Breaks

Your Guide to Roth Conversions

A Kiplinger Special Report
February 25, 2021
The 25 Cheapest U.S. Cities to Live In
places to live

The 25 Cheapest U.S. Cities to Live In

Take a look at our list of American cities with the lowest costs of living. Is one of the cheapest cities in the U.S. right for you?
October 13, 2021
Gen X: How to Make Sure Your Future Self Remains Funded
personal finance

Gen X: How to Make Sure Your Future Self Remains Funded

If you’re a Gen Xer, like me, now might be the right time to talk to a financial professional to learn more about how to adjust your retirement planni…
October 20, 2021

Recommended

How Snowbirds Can Be Taxed as Florida Residents
retirement

How Snowbirds Can Be Taxed as Florida Residents

If you live in a high-tax state during the summer but winter in Florida, you can save big bucks by establishing residency in the Sunshine State.
October 25, 2021
Living and Working in Different States Can Be a Tax Headache
state tax

Living and Working in Different States Can Be a Tax Headache

Living in one state and working in another can trigger a number of tax issues. Here are several things to keep in mind if you and/or your spouse are i…
October 22, 2021
10 Year-End Moves to Lower Your 2021 Tax Bill
taxes

10 Year-End Moves to Lower Your 2021 Tax Bill

What you do between now and the end of the year can have a significant impact on how much tax you have to pay next April.
October 19, 2021
Taxes on Unemployment Benefits: A State-by-State Guide
state tax

Taxes on Unemployment Benefits: A State-by-State Guide

Don't be surprised by an unexpected state tax bill on your unemployment benefits. Know where unemployment compensation is taxable and where it isn't.
October 19, 2021