Beer and Circus: How Big-Time College Sports Is Crippling Undergraduate Education

I’ve always been eager to debate the merits of athletic scholarships: Should college athletes instead be paid? Are these "student athletes" really getting an education while investing so much time and energy in sports? Do schools’ athletes really represent the broader student body? Sperber’s book questions the impact of college athletics programs on the student body at large.

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  • Author: Murray Sperber
  • Publisher: Holt, Henry & Company, 352 pages

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Robert Long
General Manager, Kiplinger.com
Long coordinates the daily editorial activity across Kiplinger.com. He joined Kiplinger in April 2009 from AARP.org, where he was executive producer. He led AARP's online evolution, launching companion Web sites for AARP The Magazine and the AARP Bulletin, the world's largest-circulation publications. His background includes stints at pioneering dot-coms and at trade-newsletter publishers United Communications Group and Ragan Communications, where he edited Ragan's Web Content Report, among other titles. Long is a Syracuse University graduate.