Tax Breaks

Child Tax Credit Payments Are Being Sent Today

The IRS will start delivering another round of monthly child tax credit payments today (November 15). Most families will receive their payment by direct deposit.

Are you ready for another monthly child tax credit payment? The first four payments were sent on July 15, August 13, September 15 and October 15. The fifth payment is going out today (November 15) to about 36 million families across the country (totaling approximately $15 billion). After this payment, the IRS will be sending out only one more payment. That last payment is scheduled for December 15.

For parents who received their first child tax credit payment in July, the maximum monthly payment for each child 6 to 17 years old is $250 and $300 for each kid under age 6. That's the most you can get, but families with higher incomes won't receive that much or could be denied the credit altogether. (Use Kiplinger's 2021 Child Tax Credit Calculator for an estimate of your monthly payments if you got your first payment in July.)

If you get your first monthly payment after July, the maximum payment amount is higher. That's because you'll still receive the same amount of money in 2021 (i.e., 50% of your total child tax credit for the year), but it will be paid in fewer installments. For example, the maximum monthly payment for a family that receives its first payment in November is $750-per-child for kids ages 6 through 17 and $900-per-child for kids under age 6. Again, however, wealthier families will get less or nothing at all.

How You Will Receive Your Child Tax Credit Payment

In most cases, monthly child tax credit payments are being directly deposited into each family's bank account. That's how you'll get paid if the IRS has bank account information from:

  • Your 2019 or 2020 tax return;
  • The IRS's online tool used by people who aren't required to file a tax return to sign up for the monthly child tax credit payments;
  • The IRS's online tool used in 2020 by people who aren't required to file a tax return to get a first-round stimulus check; or
  • A federal agency that provides you benefits, such as the Social Security Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs, or the Railroad Retirement Board.

If the IRS doesn't have your bank account information, it will send you a paper check or debit card by mail.

You can use the IRS's Child Tax Credit Update Portal to change the bank account information the IRS has on file. It's too late to make bank information changes for today's payment (the deadline was November 1), but you can make changes for the December 15 payment by November 29. Note that your entire monthly payment must be deposited into one bank account – you can't split them between multiple accounts.

Families who are currently scheduled to receive payments by mail can also sign up for direct deposit using the Child Tax Credit Update Portal to add their bank account information (again, it's too late to do this for today's payment). You'll be asked to provide your bank routing number and account number and indicate whether it's a savings or checking account. You'll get paid much faster if you switch to direct deposit, plus you won't have to worry about a paper check or debit card getting lost or stolen.

If you're receiving monthly child tax credit payments in the mail, you can use the portal to update your mailing address. This will help families receiving paper checks avoid mailing delays or having your payment returned as undeliverable. Once again, the deadline for changing an address for today's payment has come and gone, but you still have time to revise your address for future payments.

Stopping Monthly Child Tax Credit Payments

Some people would be better off if they didn't receive monthly child tax credit payments. For example, if you want the highest tax refund possible when you file your tax return next year, the monthly payments are going to bring down that refund. If you won't qualify for the 2021 child tax credit – e.g., your 2021 income is too high, someone else (e.g., an ex-spouse) will claim your child as a dependent in 2021, or you live outside the U.S. for more than half of 2021 – you might end up having to pay back some or all the money you received as monthly payments when you file your return next year.

If that's you, you can opt-out through the Child Tax Credit Update Portal. As you may have guessed, it's too late to opt-out of today's payment, but you can still opt-out of the final monthly payment for the year that will be sent in December. For more information on the opt-out process, see How and When to Opt-Out of Monthly Child Tax Credit Payments.

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