Money & Ethics

Knight Kiplinger delivers definitive answers to ethical challenges involving money at home and in the office.

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, June 2017

Should Colleges Give Preference to Applicants From Wealthy Families?

Every admitted student should meet the college’s basic academic qualifications.

See More On: Family Finances | Paying for College | Politics

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, May 2017

What Should Doctors and Drugmakers Do to Stop Painkiller Addiction?

Physicians and dentists need mandatory pain-management training, starting in medical and dental schools and continuing thereafter.

See More On: Health Care & Insurance | Healthy Living on a Budget

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, February 2017

How Should I Handle a Tax Windfall That I Don't Want?

If getting a huge windfall from impending tax cuts has you feeling guilty, here are some options.

See More On: Tax Planning

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, January 2017

Should Casinos Court Senior Citizens?

State gaming commissions, which regulate casinos, have an ethical obligation to crack down on predatory marketing to the elderly. But so far, most don’t seem interested.

See More On: Leisure Spending | Business Costs & Regulation | Family Finances

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, November 2016

Should My Neighbor Be Allowed to Turn His House Into a Short-Term Rental?

It's a debate that is raging in all of America’s major cities.

See More On: Small Business

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, October 2016

Should a Criminal Record Rule Out a Job Applicant?

The goal is an appropriate balance between fairness to job applicants and the employer’s right—indeed, legal obligation—to create a workplace that is safe for employees, customers and business interests.

See More On: Careers

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, September 2016

How Much Notice Should You Give Your Boss When You Quit?

Is quitting without giving your boss notice unethical?

See More On: Careers | Employee Benefits | Small Business

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, August 2016

Should Congress Dictate How Colleges Spend Their Endowments?

Charitable institutions with endowments—whether colleges, museums or hospitals—have a legal and moral obligation to honor the wishes of past donors.

See More On: Business Costs & Regulation | Paying for College

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, July 2016

Should Restaurants Raise Prices and Eliminate Tips?

Saying goodbye to tipping would address fairness and income reporting concerns.

See More On: Business Costs & Regulation | Business Travel

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, June 2016

Is It Fair for Websites to Lock Out Users of Ad Blockers?

Web users must understand: There is no such thing as a free lunch.

See More On: Technology

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, May 2016

Remedying the Gender Pay Gap

A proposed federal rule designed to bring men's and women's pay in line would be an ineffective, burdensome mandate for employers.

See More On: Business Costs & Regulation | Careers | Employee Benefits

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, April 2016

Why Can't I Give More to My Candidate's Campaign?

There should be immediate disclosure of every donation to every political fund of any kind. That’s crucial for a healthy democracy.

See More On: Politics

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, March 2016

Splitting Time Between States to Pay Less Tax

If you try to play it both ways, expect your old state to try to keep taxing you.

See More On: Tax Planning

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, January 2016

Are Drug Prices Unethically High?

It makes sense for the maker of a best-selling drug to lower the price gradually over the life of its patent.

See More On: Health Care & Insurance

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, December 2015

Do We Owe Students Two Free Years of College?

Using taxpayer funds to help young Americans get post-secondary training of some sort would be money well spent. The challenge is figuring out how to do it most sensibly.

See More On: Paying for College | Politics

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, November 2015

Is This Lump-Sum Offer for Future Benefits Ethical?

Most structured-settlement sales involve the transfer of only a portion of future payments.

See More On: Making Your Money Last

From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, October 2015

Should You Have a Right to Delete Personal Online Information?

Web sites should be obligated to comply with requests to remove information under certain circumstances.

See More On: Technology | Careers

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