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James K. Glassman

Contributing Columnist
Kiplinger's Personal Finance

James K. Glassman is a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. His most recent book is Safety Net: The Strategy for De-Risking Your Investments in a Time of Turbulence.

Latest Features

Opening Shot
April 2017

Buy Retail Stocks at Wholesale Prices

Department-store stocks have lost one-fifth of their value in the past five years, while the overall stock market has nearly doubled.

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Opening Shot
March 2017

Investors, Stop Worrying About a Bear Market

It's not like there aren't risks out there, but the smart strategy is to stay in stocks, and stay diversified.

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Opening Shot
February 2017

Best Ways to Invest in Bonds Now

With Donald Trump's election, the yield on U.S. bonds has risen dramatically. That spells opportunity for bond investors.

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SLIDE SHOW
February 2017

6 Bond Funds to Boost Your Income

In part because of the election of Donald Trump, the yield on U.S. bonds—the percentage of your investment you get for holding them—has soared. For bond investors who seek relatively high income without ...

See More From: Mutual Funds

Opening Shot
January 2017

A Surprise Boost for Emerging Markets

Trump’s election has provided emerging markets with an unexpected benefit: a stronger dollar, which makes foreign goods even cheaper here.

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SLIDE SHOW
April 2017

27 Best Stocks for 2017

Amid a dense fog of uncertainty, an aging bull will have to find its footing in 2017. Rarely has the way forward been so obscured by the murky policies of a new political regime, as well as by questions ...

See More From: Stocks & Bonds

Opening Shot
December 2016

James Glassman's 10 Stock Picks for 2017

Having beaten the market in 2016, I'm banking on these 10 stocks to outperform in the year ahead — and beyond.

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Opening Shot
November 2016

5 Tech Investments Poised for Growth

To get higher profits over the long haul, you need higher sales of products and services that keep improving. Tech firms are the best place to look.

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SLIDE SHOW
October 2016

11 Stocks to Buy No Matter Who the Next President Is

Boosting economic growth will be a top priority of the new president, whoever wins the election. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump differ in some ways on how to get the job done. For example, Clinton wants ...

See More From: Stocks & Bonds

Opening Shot
October 2016

12 Stocks to Buy No Matter Who the Next President Is

The U.S.'s long-neglected infrastructure is set to get a spending boost, and these stocks stand to benefit.

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Opening Shot
September 2016

Investors, It's Time to Bet on Banks

The big banks have different personalities. JPMorgan Chase is strong and steady. Wells Fargo is seen as the best managed and most innovative.

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Opening Shot
August 2016

Investments to Replace Bonds in Your Portfolio

If you're looking for safer diversification after the fallout from Brexit, check out these options.

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Opening Shot
June 2016

10 Good U.S. Stocks to Play the Global Economy

You don't need to invest in foreign stocks to get exposure to the rest of the world.

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Opening Shot
July 2016

Guess When the Next Recession Will Be

Even if you sold all of your stocks in anticipation of the next recession, you wouldn’t know when to get back into the market.

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Opening Shot
May 2016

7 Small-Cap Stock Funds That Could Pay Off Big

I'm convinced that the single best sector for investors right now is small-cap value stocks.

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Opening Shot
April 2016

6 Wall Street Stocks That Are Cheap: Goldman Sachs, More

As candidates and others poor-mouth the financial industry, you can score stock bargains in the sector.

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Opening Shot
April 2016

4 Tips to Buy Stocks Low

You need to train yourself to see declines in the stock market as opportunities, not as calamities.

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