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Art Pine

Contributing Editor
The Kiplinger Letter

Latest Features

Practical Economics
March 2013

Chinese Investors Shopping for American Firms

Early missteps and ongoing political tensions won't slow a growing infusion of Chinese capital into a variety of U.S. enterprises.

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Practical Economics
February 2013

Playing a Dangerous Currency Game

Countries eager to stimulate their economies and boost exports -- the U.S. included -- are on a perilous path

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Practical Economics
January 2013

Manufacturing Bouncing Back

America's manufacturing sector is recovering and poised for a modest rebound. The question is how much?

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Practical Economics
January 2013

China: Reforms or No Reforms?

China's new leaders have hinted that they'll adopt badly needed market-oriented economic reforms, but will they follow through?

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Practical Economics
January 2013

Just Ahead: The Robotics Revolution

The U.S. is on the cusp of an explosion in robotics that will have a significant impact on business and the economy over the next decade. Here's how it will affect you.

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Practical Economics
October 2012

A Fork in the Road for China

China's deepening economic slowdown alone isn't damaging enough to blunt the U.S. recovery, but the U.S. has a lot at stake in Beijing's response to it.

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Practical Economics
September 2012

Can Washington Boost the Economy?

Now that the Fed has used up all its ammunition, any further stimulus will be in Congress' hands.

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Practical Economics
September 2012

Ethanol: Running Out of Gas?

The drought's damage to the U.S. corn crop puts the ethanol industry on the spot.

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Practical Economics
August 2012

The Federal Reserve's Rocky Road

The nation's beleaguered monetary policy gurus have tough decisions to make, regardless of the presidential outcome.

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Practical Economics
August 2012

A Push for New Labor Concessions -- Now?

U.S. steelmakers and Caterpillar want steep concessions from their unions. If they succeed, will other big manufacturing firms follow?

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Practical Economics
July 2012

After the Election: The Future of Outsourcing

The two major presidential candidates are blaming each other for the outsourcing they say has moved American jobs abroad. Who is responsible?

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Practical Economics
July 2012

China: How Its Slowdown Will Affect the U.S.

China’s economy is slowing visibly, diluting its impact as the major engine of global economic growth. Will that blunt the fragile U.S. recovery as well?

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Practical Economics
July 2012

U.S. as Safe Haven: How Long Can It Last?

Despite all its economic problems, America continues to be a favorite for currency traders and foreign investors of all kinds.

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Practical Economics
June 2012

Joblessness: Becoming a Long-Term Problem?

The number of Americans out of work for a full year or longer reached an all-time high last year. It's declining now, but very slowly. The cost to both those out of work and those who are employed is high.

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Practical Economics
June 2012

New U.S.-China Rivalry: Vying for Asia's Trade

Both governments are now pushing regional free trade agreements designed to expand commerce with Asian countries. But they're very different -- and their impact is beyond trade.

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Practical Economics
May 2012

Slower Consumer Spending Gains Ahead

Consumers' purchases account for nearly 70% of the nation's GDP, so as their spending goes, so goes the economy.

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Practical Economics
May 2012

China: Cooling It Until Next Spring?

Despite the flap over Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng, relations between Beijing and Washington are visibly better than they were in 2010 and 2011.

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