Starting Out


How to Get Your First Credit Card

Lisa Gerstner

Plus, how to use it wisely and earn the lowest interest rates.



If you’re smart about when and how you use it, a credit card can help you build a solid credit history and boost your credit score. That will help you get a lower rate when you apply for a mortgage or other loan.

See Also: Our Special Report for Starting Out

Qualifying for your first credit card can be a pain because you may not have much of a credit record. Check with your bank or credit union, which may offer its customers a break. Or apply for a retail credit card, such as the Target REDcard or the Chevron/Texaco gas card. Retail cards are often easier to get than other cards, although they typically come with high annual percentage rates and low spending limits. A third option: a secured credit card, which requires you to make a cash deposit. On-time student-loan payments also help you build a good credit history.

It’s easy to rack up a big balance quickly, and if you don’t pay off the full balance each billing cycle, you’ll owe interest. Pay only the minimum and you’ll be paying for a while. For example, if you charge $2,000 on a credit card with a 22% interest rate and make a $40 payment every month, it will take more than 11 years to pay it off—and you’ll fork over $3,471 in interest. You may find that the best way to control your cash flow is to use a debit card or prepaid debit card—once you spend the money, it’s gone.

Many credit cards carry perks such as extended warranties and purchase protection, which may get you a repair, replacement or reimbursement for an item you bought with the card that is damaged or stolen within a certain period after purchase. And some rewards cards offer up to 5% or 6% cash back on certain purchases, such as groceries or gas. (You’ll need a solid credit history to qualify for the best rewards cards.) The Discover It card, for one, pays 5% cash back in categories that rotate quarterly and 1% on all other purchases. Compare annual percentage rates and fees, such as annual and late-payment fees.

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Know the Score

Credit scores are based on information from your credit history, and they’re a shorthand way for lenders to judge your creditworthiness. There are many credit scores, but lenders commonly use the FICO score when you apply for credit. You often have to pay to see your FICO score—and the version that you buy may not be the same one a lender views. The VantageScore is another gauge that lenders use, though it hasn’t been as widely adopted as the FICO score. The latest version of the VantageScore operates on the same scale as the FICO score (300 to 850), but it’s calculated with a different formula.

Don’t get caught up trying to track every score. To get an idea of where your credit stands and how you can improve it, use free tools such as Credit.com, which provides two credit scores based on information from the credit bureau Experian. CreditKarma.com offers free scores based on Trans­Union information (it also has an app).

To protect your credit score, always make your payment by the due date, even if it’s the minimum. Missing just one payment can ding your score. You should also keep the balance on your credit card low compared with the card’s maximum limit. Ideally, your charges won’t exceed about 20% of the card’s limit. And don’t apply for several credit cards in a short time. That can tug down your score. Credit.com and Credit Karma both provide insight on how each portion of your score stacks up.

Check Your Credit Reports

At www.annualcreditreport.com, you can get a free credit report annually from each of the major credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Your reports list your credit accounts, including loans and credit cards, and provide information such as your record of on-time payments, the age of each account, and inquiries from lenders to check your report. Credit reports also point out any delinquencies, such as a bankruptcy or an account that went into debt collection. You can request all three of your free reports at once or stagger them throughout the year, ordering a report every four months.

If information on any of the reports is incorrect, you’ll have to correct it with each bureau that has the erroneous information. The procedure is spelled out on each bureau’s Web site.

You can use free credit-monitoring tools to get e-mail alerts of changes in your credit reports. Credit Karma will monitor your TransUnion report free, and Credit Sesame does the same for your Experian report. If you get a notifi­cation that, say, a new credit account has been opened but you didn’t open it, you can investigate further in case someone has stolen your identity.

Pick Your Plastic

Pros Cons Our Picks
Credit Cards

Strongest fraud protections

Helps build credit history

Perks such as purchase protection and travel insurance

Rewards, such as points for travel or cash back, on some cards

Temptation to accumulate debt

Late fees

Some cards have an annual fee

High interest rates compared with home and car loans

The Barclaycard Rewards Master Card (for average credit) offers cash back on purchases and has a lower bar for qualifying than other rewards cards.

If you carry a balance, check out the First Command Bank Platinum Visa, which has a 6.25% rate.

Debit Cards

Limits spending to what you have in the bank

No monthly payments or interest charges

Using it may fulfill requirement for no-fee checking

High fees if you allow overdrafts

Weaker fraud protection than a credit card

Doesn't build credit history

May be harder to use for hotel and rental-car reservations

The Lake Michigan Credit Union Max Checking account pays 3% on up to $15,000 if you use your debit card ten times monthly, have direct deposit and meet other requirements. Join by donating $5 to the ALS Association of Michigan.

Prepaid Cards

Limits overspending

Some have direct deposit, ATM access and online bill-paying

Easier to acquire if you have poor credit

May charge high activation fee and monthly maintenance charges

Fewer fraud protections

Doesn't build credit history

The American Express Serve waives its $1 monthly fee if you have direct deposit or load at least $500 a month, has no fees at some ATMs and has mobile check deposit.

Bluebird from American Express and Walmart has no monthly or activation fee and no fees at certain ATMs (with direct deposit). It also offers mobile check deposit.



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