Washington Matters


Obama Gets Plenty of Advice on Running Mates


Barack Obama may have lost his chief V.P. hunter when Jim Johnson was forced to quit yesterday, but that doesn't mean there's any shortage of people telling him what he should do. The advice ranges from the expected -- Hillary Clinton -- to the highly unlikely -- Al Gore.

 

It was James Carville, of all people, who made the pitch for Gore, arguing on CNN that nothing is more important than energy security and that Gore would be the ideal choice to be vice president and energy czar in an Obama administration. Gore is certainly qualified, and a majority of Americans did vote for him to be president in 2000, but it seems unlikely that the Nobel Prize winner would want the No. 2 job again. Still, in this unusual year, anything is possible.

 

Amy Walter, respected former analyst for the Cook Political Report and now a pundit on MSNBC, pushes for Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius. Walter argues that Obama should pick someone who reinforces his message of change and not try to balance the ticket with an old, experienced white male. Still, it's hard to see Hillary Clinton's backers not being upset if Obama skips over Hillary, who did all that groundbreaking work, to pick another woman. Incidentally, in the new Wall Street Journal/NBC poll, a hypothetical Obama-Clinton ticket beat a McCain-Romney ticket, 51% to 42%, a boost over Obama's 47%-41% lead over McCain in a one-on-one match-up.

 

The Boston Globe puts the spotlight on Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine, saying Kaine could boost support among business leaders, Hispanics and Catholics -- and help bring Virginia into the Democratic column.

 

And then there's advice on whom to avoid. Jonathan Capehart, writing in the Washington Post, says gay Democrats are up in arms at the notion that Obama may turn to former Sen. Sam Nunn. It was Nunn who blocked Bill Clinton from lifting the military's ban on gays in 1993.

 




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